scientific talks

The Performing Art of Science Presentation at AAS 229

by Guest September 14, 2016

This guest post is by Emily Rice and Chris Crockett on behalf of the AAS Employment Committee and is one of a series of posts advertising the activities at the upcoming #AAS229 Meeting in Grapevine, TX We’d like to encourage you to consider attending The Performing Art of Science Presentation Workshop on Tuesday, January 3, […]

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Fabric Conference Posters FTW!

by Guest March 25, 2015

Emily Rice is an assistant professor at the College of Staten Island and a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History. She is also responsible for those parody songs that get stuck in your head. Dearest Colleagues, I have printed my last paper conference poster and carried my last poster tube. Forsooth I […]

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10 things not to say at work

by Jane August 18, 2014

A long time ago, I borrowed a camcorder* and taped myself giving a practice talk.  Then I forced myself to watch it.   It was excruciatingly awkward.  Every dumb pause, every verbal tic, every “literal” that’s figurative, every “uh, well, um”, gets magnified when you hear yourself.  Ouch. But doing it, and repeating every few years, […]

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Report: Gender in AAS Talks

by Jess K March 19, 2014

Cross-posted from University of Washington Astronomy PhD Candidate Jim Davenport’s blog: Today I’m proud to announce that my AAS 223 Hack Day project is finally finished! Our “paper” (really an informal report) on the study of gender in AAS talks has hit astro-ph: http://arxiv.org/abs/1403.3091 This all started about 6 months ago when I was attending a different astronomy conference. I observed that […]

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How to give a killer talk

by Chris Crockett January 3, 2014

Giving a talk at AAS next week? Want to blow away the audience with your eloquent oratory? This post is for you! Just ahead of the big meeting, everyone should check out an article in the Harvard Business Review by Chris Anderson, curator for TED: How to Give a Killer Presentation (Registration is free to read […]

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Make award winning posters

by Chris Crockett December 27, 2013

Just in time for AAS, Jason Wright at Penn State recently posted a fantastic article on his blog with tips on how to make an effective poster. The tips come from his postdoc Ming Zhao, who recently won third place in the  Penn State Postdoc Research Exhibition with a poster on “Studying the Atmospheres of […]

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Conference organizing 101

by Chris Crockett September 11, 2013

Organizing a conference can be a logistical nightmare. Picking a site, finding hotels, managing payments, inviting speakers, scheduling sessions (including those all-important coffee breaks)….and speaking of coffee breaks, do I need to buy coffee? Oh, and food. What about a banquet? How are the rooms going to be set up? Should I publish proceedings from […]

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Better diagrams for your presentations

by Chris Crockett July 17, 2013

Sick of dull, uninformative diagrams on your slides? We’ve added a link to our Presentations Wiki on how to make your diagrams more understandable, efficient, and pleasant. If you remember nothing else, keep this in mind: simplify! Already taken a stab at simplifying? Do it again! And don’t forget, if you have any presentation resources that […]

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Presentations on iPad v2 [Ask AstroBetter]

by Kelle April 24, 2013

We’ve covered this topic of iPad presentations before, but with an emphasis on Keynote for iPad pros and cons. While Keynote for the iPad now supports actions and is probably still the best app for creating presentations on the iPad, it’s not the best solution if you create presentations in PowerPoint or want to make […]

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Speaking with Confidence – or Why We Ramble [Link]

by Jessica Lu April 27, 2012

Good verbal communication is a valuable skill for a scientist. The article below discusses a common trait for many young scientists — rambling. Is That Your Final Answer? Or, Why Graduate Students Ramble - The Professor Is In Do you hear yourself in those examples? How have you improved your question answering style? What advice do […]

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