grad students

Honing your Hubble Application

by Guest August 20, 2014

This is an anonymous guest post from two past members of the Hubble Fellowship committee. The Hubble Postdoctoral Fellowship among the most prestigious awards in our field and is worn as a badge of honor throughout an Astronomer’s entire career. About 10–20 are awarded each year to applicants from around the world to fund a […]

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Entrepreneurship’s role in physics education

by Guest August 28, 2013

This is a guest post by Doug Arion, Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Professor of Entrepreneurship at Carthage College.  As astronomers, there are many things we wish we had been taught besides just astronomy and physics. While we learn a lot from the ‘school of hard knocks’, there are ways to make sure that […]

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Graduate School as Entrepreneurship

by Guest August 26, 2013

This is a guest post by Mikhail Klassen, a PhD candidate at McMaster University. He writes about work and life within and beyond academia at The UnStudent Blog. When I speak to other graduate students, they tend to say that they love doing science, but that they are anxious about what they’ll do after graduation. […]

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The adviser every grad student needs [Link]

by Chris Crockett August 23, 2013

An adviser’s role is to mold today’s grad students into tomorrow’s scholars. How can advisers best prepare their students for academic success? And how can grad students ensure they have a fruitful relationship with their advisers? An article at ProfHacker, 5 Tips for Being the Adviser Your Grad Student Needs, looks at five things you […]

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Communicating Science Workshop for Grad Students

by Guest February 25, 2013

This is a guest post by Chris Faesi, a graduate student at Harvard, on behalf of the organizers of the conference described below. To address the need for training in communication skills, and to enable future scientists to become ambassadors for their work and for science generally, members of the Astrobites and Chembites community are […]

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