nsf

The Astronomy OIR Study recommendations for the LSST era

by Guest September 16, 2015

Maria Womack (@StarzanPlanets) is a physics professor at the University of South Florida. From 2011-2015 she worked as a ‘rotating’ astronomy program director to the National Science Foundation and her research includes multi-wavelength spectroscopy of comets and exoplanets. This is the second in a series of three guest posts on the recently released National Research […]

{ 3 comments }

Read more →

NSF Deadline Approaching!

by Danny Barringer October 15, 2014

As we’re sure many of you know, the deadline for all things NSF, including the NSF Graduate Fellowship, is fast approaching (some faster than others!), and will be on us before we know it. To make your lives easier, we would like to remind you of the resources the AstroBetter Wiki has at your disposal. […]

{ 0 comments }

Read more →

Top 10 Ways to Improve Your NSF Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellowship (AAPF) Proposal

by Guest August 13, 2014

Joan Schmelz is a solar physicist at the University of Memphis. She works with EUV and X-ray images and spectroscopy in order to address the coronal heating problem. She is also the chair of the Committee on the Status of Women in Astronomy and is currently serving as a rotator in NSF’s astronomy division. The […]

{ 5 comments }

Read more →

Newbies Guide to Town Halls at #AAS223

by Kelle January 3, 2014

When I first started going to Town Hall meetings at AAS Meetings, I was very disappointed. I couldn’t understand what was going on. It felt like I had turned on an episode of a soap opera in the middle of a season. There was clearly a plot playing out, but 1) I didn’t have any […]

{ 5 comments }

Read more →

A tale of three proposals

by Guest November 20, 2013

This is a guest post from Dr. Joseph Harrington, a Professor at the University of Central Florida. The post is written in response to an earlier AstroBetter guest post, The Inside Scoop  on NSF Review Panels. A recent guest post on AstroBetter, The Inside Scoop  on NSF Review Panels, is an excellent writeup of the facts, […]

{ 9 comments }

Read more →

ADS: How to find author names and affiliations

by Guest July 22, 2013

This is a guest post by Alessondra Springmann. The original article can be found here. The astronomy and planetary science communities have a fantastic tool for finding scientific papers previously published: the Astrophysics Data System, or ADS, supported by NASA and run out of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.  The main feature I use is […]

{ 2 comments }

Read more →

The Inside Scoop on NSF Review Panels

by Guest July 8, 2013

This is a guest post by an anonymous contributor. There has been a lot of talk recently about the effect that sequester cuts have had on the funding situation in astronomy (and science in general).  Our field depends greatly on federal grant money (jobs! job! jobs!) and the pot is shrinking.  This means that every […]

{ 4 comments }

Read more →

How much does a typical astronomy paper cost taxpayers?

by Chris Crockett April 26, 2013

About $20,000. That’s one of the take-home messages from Jim Davenport’s light-hearted analysis of the last ten years of NSF AST grants. Want to know which paper in the last ten years is the most efficient (in terms of number of papers published vs. size of grant)? Read more about his analysis right here!

{ 0 comments }

Read more →

Endorse the System Roadmap Commitee’s Statement on the NSF Portfolio Review

by Kelle December 3, 2012

Bottom line: Please consider endorsing the System Roadmap Committee’s Statement with several recommendations regarding the implementation of the NSF/AST Portfolio Review that are intended to reflect the views of the broad community by submitting your name and affiliation on this Google Form.  The deadline to endorse is this Friday, December 7, 2012. As I’ve described […]

{ 3 comments }

Read more →

Let’s Discuss the NSF Portfolio Review Report

by Kelle August 17, 2012

In short, there’s not enough money allocated to the US National Science Foundation (NSF) to do everything the US astronomical community wants to do so some things need to go. In order to figure out what to cut, the NSF commissioned a “Portfolio Review” committee to take a good hard look. Yesterday, the result of […]

{ 32 comments }

Read more →