astro community

Two Astronomers Named Sarah Survive Academia with this One Simple Trick!

by Danny Barringer July 23, 2014

Dr. Sarah Ballard completed her PhD in Astronomy & Astrophysics at Harvard University in 2012 and is now a NASA Carl Sagan fellow at the University of Washington. She’s written articles for the Harvard Crimson and for the Women in Astronomy blog about parental leave, values affirmation, and the intelligence of groups. On her website, [...]

{ 5 comments }

Read more →

Fed Up with Sexual Harassment

by Jess K May 14, 2014

This week the folks over at the Women in Astronomy Blog are highlighting the problem of sexual harassment within the astronomy community.  Every day there will be a new post discussing this problem with advice about how to help victims within your department, and what to do when you experience or witness sexual harassment.  Below [...]

{ 0 comments }

Read more →

KICP Education & Outreach Summer School for Grad Students (June 16-27)

by Laura Trouille April 23, 2014

KICP Education & Outreach Summer School for Graduate Students June 16-27 Chicago, IL http://kicp.uchicago.edu/EOsummer Applications due: May 13, 2014 We are very pleased to announce a hands-on summer school for graduate students interested in education and outreach (E&O). This school will feature a week of practicum that will immerse participants in E&O; for example, presenting [...]

{ 0 comments }

Read more →

Report: Gender in AAS Talks

by Jess K March 19, 2014

Cross-posted from University of Washington Astronomy PhD Candidate Jim Davenport’s blog: Today I’m proud to announce that my AAS 223 Hack Day project is finally finished! Our “paper” (really an informal report) on the study of gender in AAS talks has hit astro-ph: http://arxiv.org/abs/1403.3091 This all started about 6 months ago when I was attending a different astronomy conference. I observed that [...]

{ 3 comments }

Read more →

The Whys and Hows of Licensing Scientific Code

by Jake VanderPlas March 10, 2014

Jake Vanderplas is the Director of Research in the Physical Sciences at the University of Washington’s eScience Institute. He is a maintainer and/or frequent contributor to many open source Python projects, including scikit-learn, scipy, matplotlib, and others.  He occasionally blogs about Python, data visualization, open science, and related topics at Pythonic Perambulations. You may find [...]

{ 16 comments }

Read more →

The 2013 CSWA Demographics Survey: Portrait of a Generation of Women in Astronomy

by Jess K March 5, 2014

The below is reproduced from the January 2014 Status: A report on Women in Astronomy.  The 2013 CSWA Demographics Survey, by A. Meredith Hughes, Wesleyan University. As we consider how best to promote the full participation of women in astronomy, it is important to use quantitative methods to monitor progress and identify problems. Accordingly, collecting demographic data [...]

{ 0 comments }

Read more →

AAS Hack Day 2014

by Elizabeth January 22, 2014

On Thursday, January 9th, a band of intrepid astronomers gathered for the second AAS Hack Day. Hack Days are traditional events in software development circles, where people with skills, ideas, and the willingness to dedicate a day of their lives get together to make interesting projects happen. Much like the first Hack Day at AAS [...]

{ 1 comment }

Read more →

My Successful Experience with Sexual Harassment

by Jess K January 22, 2014

Cross-posted from Women in Astronomy: The following is an anonymous guest post from a regular reader of the Women in Astronomy Blog. The below is a description of an individual’s experience with sexual harassment.  What worked for her, might not work for everyone.  If you are being sexually harassed, please contact the sexual harassment officer at [...]

{ 1 comment }

Read more →

How to improve the winter AAS meeting? (2014 edition)

by Jane January 15, 2014

We’ve had a week to recover from the 223rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS).  Let’s talk about what we thought worked, what didn’t and how we can improve the “Super Bowl of Astronomy”?   (Last year’s discussion got 57 comments; this is a topic our community feels strongly about.) What did our Society do [...]

{ 12 comments }

Read more →

Flirt with extreme caution #AAS223

by Kelle January 2, 2014

At all conferences, the boundary between professional and social interactions can be very blurred. While one of the best things about conferences like the AAS Meeting is hanging out with friends and meeting new people, we all need to remember that these are still primarily professional relationships and we need be very conscious about socially [...]

{ 3 comments }

Read more →