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Rumor Mill Update

by Danny Barringer August 26, 2015

Now that we’ve begun a new academic year, the AstroBetter Rumor Mill has been wiped clean in preparation for another year of job searching. You can find the Faculty and Staff Rumor Mill page here, and the Postdoc and Term Rumor Mill page here. Happy job hunting everyone!

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Crowdsourcing Open Astrophysics Texts for Everyone

by Guest July 27, 2015

Michael Zingale is a computational astrophysicist who enjoys blowing up stars and working on new algorithms to enable these simulations.  He is an Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University on Long Island, NY. Many of us have written notes for our classes or have searched online for notes written by our […]

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The Starchive: An open access, open source database of the nearest stars and beyond

by Guest April 27, 2015

Angelle Tanner is an assistant professor at Mississippi State University with interests in multiple methods of exoplanet detection and characterization. Situation 1:You make a preliminary list of target stars using SIMBAD and then follow up with a tedious search through Vizier and individual papers for all the additional observational data you need to motivate a […]

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Beyond the U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory

by Guest December 29, 2014

Joseph Lazio is a Chief Scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and former Project Scientist of the U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory. This post provides an update on the status of Virtual Observatory efforts within the U.S., following the end of the U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory Project. The VAO developed various tools […]

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Calling All Diversity Programs

by Guest September 24, 2014

Sarah Jane Schmidt is the Columbus Postdoctoral Fellow at Ohio State University. Her research focuses on ultracool dwarfs, but her post today is related to her work with the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program as a graduate student at the University of Washington. There are a number of diversity programs run at different institutions, spanning a […]

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Two Astronomers Named Sarah Survive Academia with this One Simple Trick!

by Guest July 23, 2014

Dr. Sarah Ballard completed her PhD in Astronomy & Astrophysics at Harvard University in 2012 and is now a NASA Carl Sagan fellow at the University of Washington. She’s written articles for the Harvard Crimson and for the Women in Astronomy blog about parental leave, values affirmation, and the intelligence of groups. On her website, […]

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To the Other Side (or, I wonder what my friends are doing now)

by Guest July 21, 2014

Jason Steffen is a Lindheimer Fellow and Research Assistant Professor at CIERA at Northwestern University.  He works (now) primarily in the field of exoplanets, but has been known to frequent the fields of experimental cosmology, gravitation, and dark matter. Most AAS members eventually transition from astronomy to something else. Like professional athletes, most scientific careers […]

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Are we publishing unreliable research?

by Chris Crockett December 6, 2013

Publish or perish. Like it or not, prolific paper publishing dictates academic career success.  The quest to get the grant, land that postdoc, achieve tenure means that the necessary dirty work of science—replication—often gets brushed under the carpet. The Economist recently published an article—Unreliable research: Trouble at the lab—that looks at just how bad scientists […]

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I’m sorry this blog post is late

by Guest December 4, 2013

This is a guest post by David Charbonneau, cross-posted from Women in Astronomy. I am sorry this blog post is late. I meant to post it Monday. Yes, the blog is important! But I think my daughter might have lice and I had to deal with that urgently. I am sorry I can’t accept the invitation to […]

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The “Gray Zone” of Academic Ethics: Results and Reactions

by Guest November 25, 2013

This is a guest post by Caitlin Casey (IfA, Hawaii) and Kartik Sheth (NRAO) who recently hosted a “Diversity and Ethics” Seminar at the Aspen Center for Physics.  This post is a follow-up to their Ethics and Diversity Poll. Thanks to all astronomers who filled out the “Ethics and Diversity” poll back in September.  We hope it was an […]

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