Learn Software Carpentry at #AAS229

by Guest on September 27, 2016

Azalee Bostroem (@astro_az) is a graduate student in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of California, Davis.

Do you find yourself reading code in Python, sometimes attempting to update it, and all the time wishing you had been taught some Python in undergrad or graduate school? As astronomers we find ourselves frequently reading, updating, and writing code without any formal training. Most of us are self-taught and as a result haven’t learned many tools that would make our job (and/or thesis) faster and easier. We are offering an abbreviated Software Carpentry Workshop at the AAS 229 Meeting aimed at beginner programmers from any career stage (undergraduate to professor, researcher, industry expert…). [Read more...]

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The Space Telescope Science Institute and core developers from the Astropy community are sponsoring a workshop at the January 2017 meeting of the American Astronomical Society #AAS229.

This workshop will cover the use of Python tools for astronomical data analysis and visualization in the era of JWST, with the focus primarily on UV, Optical and IR data. Data analysis tools for JWST are being written in Python and distributed as part of Astropy, a community developed Python library for astronomy,  and its affiliated packages, many of which are designed to be compatible with JWST, HST and other major mission data.

Our goals will be to introduce you to the variety of tools which are already available inside the Astropy library as well as provide ample hands-on time during which you’ll be able to explore the science analysis capabilities which the greater python environment and community provide. [Read more...]

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This guest post is by Emily Rice and Chris Crockett on behalf of the AAS Employment Committee and is one of a series of posts advertising the activities at the upcoming #AAS229 Meeting in Grapevine, TX

We’d like to encourage you to consider attending The Performing Art of Science Presentation Workshop on Tuesday, January 3, 2017 at the AAS Meeting in Grapevine, TX.

Talking about science — whether to colleagues, students, or the public — can be just as essential as the papers, proposals, observations, programming, and data analysis that comprise our more stereotypical science activities. An engaging presentation makes others take notice of what you’re doing and can be key to breeding new ideas, building collaborations, or landing a job. Yet, it’s an aspect of being a scientist that few of us are trained in.

If you want to give clear and memorable talks, ones that make your audience engage with your content and remember it (and you) long after they’ve left the room, then there’s a workshop you’ll want to check out at the January AAS meeting.
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The American Astronomical Society is sponsoring a skill-building workshop — and an ongoing community — to support early-career astronomers (graduate students, post-docs, recent faculty) in doing effective outreach to schools, families, and the public.  Working with the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and other outreach organizations, the AAS Astronomy Ambassadors program (now in its fifth year) offers you two days of hands-on training, extensive resources and pre-tested activities (plus a like-minded group of peers.)  If you are a younger astronomer with an interest in spending a fraction of your time helping students or the public become more scientifically literate, this is an invitation to join the growing Ambassadors community. [Read more...]

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Rumor Mill Update: 2016

by Danny Barringer September 7, 2016

Now that we’ve begun a new academic year, the AstroBetter Rumor Mill has been wiped clean in preparation for another year of job searching. You can find the Faculty and Staff Rumor Mill page here, and the Postdoc and Term Rumor Mill page here. Happy job hunting everyone!

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Super Charge your ADS Searches with Filters

by Guest August 1, 2016

Alex Holachek is a front end developer for the NASA Astrophysics Data System based at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.   The majority of queries in ADS are searches for authors. Author searches are simple when the author has a unique name, but what happens when the name is a common one? A search “Wu, […]

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Twitter at Conferences, Part 3: LOC & SOC

by Guest July 20, 2016

Abigail Stevens is an astronomy PhD candidate at the Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam. Her research is on spectral-timing analysis of X-ray binaries. Image credit: HST/Twitter/A.L. Stevens This is the third post in a three-part series on Twitter at Conferences, aimed at conference organizers (if you missed them, I recommend reading the first post […]

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Twitter at Conferences, Part 2: Twitter users

by Guest July 13, 2016

Abigail Stevens is an astronomy PhD candidate at the Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam. Her research is on spectral-timing analysis of X-ray binaries. Image credit: HST/Twitter/A.L. Stevens This is the second post in a three-part series on Twitter at Conferences, aimed at Twitter users (I recommend reading the first post if you missed it, […]

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Managing Citations (Collaboratively) in Google Docs

by Guest July 11, 2016

Isabel Little is the Marketing & Community Manager @ Paperpile and a Masters candidate in Learning & Technology @ the University of Oxford. A while back, Kelle shared her experiences with writing collaborative proposals in Google Docs. Her verdict was that the final product turned out much better (and was accomplished much faster) than if […]

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Twitter at Conferences, Part 1: Non-tweeters

by Guest July 6, 2016

Abigail Stevens is an astronomy PhD candidate at the Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam. Her research is on spectral-timing analysis of X-ray binaries. Image credit: HST/Twitter/A.L. Stevens This is the first post in a three-part series on Twitter at Conferences, aimed at non-Twitter-users and all conference attendees. There have also been a few AstroBetter […]

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