Crowdsourcing Open Astrophysics Texts for Everyone

by Guest July 27, 2015

Michael Zingale is a computational astrophysicist who enjoys blowing up stars and working on new algorithms to enable these simulations.  He is an Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University on Long Island, NY. Many of us have written notes for our classes or have searched online for notes written by our […]


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Updates on ADS Interfaces and the Announcement of Bumblebee

by Guest July 20, 2015

Alberto Accomazzi (@aaccomazzi) is the Program Manager of the NASA Astrophysics Data System based at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. The Astrophysics Data System (ADS) is a tool for finding astronomy and planetary science publications. ADS currently has three different interfaces: ADS “Classic” — the one you all know and love, ADS “Labs” or “2.0” […]


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Why should I use Authorea to write my papers?

by Guest July 13, 2015

Matteo Cantiello is a theoretical astrophysicist at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics and Authorea’s Chief Scientist. I am aware that a while back a lot of astronomers have tried out writing their research articles on Authorea, a web-based collaborative writing platform. Some were disappointed by the lack of certain advanced LaTeX features (e.g., deluxetables, […]


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Python/3D Visualization: A new book available for students and scientists

by Guest July 8, 2015

Brian Kent is an associate scientist with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory working on pipeline software for VLA and ALMA, and has interests in galaxy surveys, dynamics, and 3D graphics and visualization. A new book published by IOP is now available entitled “3D Scientific Visualization with Blender.” This work is written for a broad scientific […]


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The Starchive: An open access, open source database of the nearest stars and beyond

by Guest April 27, 2015

Angelle Tanner is an assistant professor at Mississippi State University with interests in multiple methods of exoplanet detection and characterization. Situation 1:You make a preliminary list of target stars using SIMBAD and then follow up with a tedious search through Vizier and individual papers for all the additional observational data you need to motivate a […]

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Fabric Conference Posters FTW!

by Guest March 25, 2015

Emily Rice is an assistant professor at the College of Staten Island and a research associate at the American Museum of Natural History. She is also responsible for those parody songs that get stuck in your head. Dearest Colleagues, I have printed my last paper conference poster and carried my last poster tube. Forsooth I […]


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Details and discussion about impending changes to ApJ and AJ

by Kelle February 13, 2015

During AAS225 in Seattle, there was an announcement about changes coming to the AAS Journals: Astrophysical Journal (ApJ), Astrophysical Journal Letters (ApJL), and the Astronomical Journal (AJ). These changes include lots of awesome things such as “linking articles directly to data archives, providing for video abstracts, improving figure presentation, making figures interactive, introducing the ability […]


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Licensing Astrophysics Codes session at AAS 225: Link

by Danny Barringer February 4, 2015

For those of you not in the know, at the past AAS meeting, a session was held on Licensing Astrophysics Codes based on suggestions that such a session would be interesting and useful to astronomers. This is a topic previously discussed in an AstroBetter guest post by Jake VanderPlas in March of 2014. In case […]


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Data Exploration with Glue

by Guest February 2, 2015

Chris Beaumont is a software engineer at Counsyl, and previously a software engineer at Harvard and the Space Telescope Science Institute. Glue began as a side project during Chris’ PhD thesis, and is now being developed to visualize data from the James Webb Space Telescope. We’ve recently released version 0.4 of Glue, a Python-based GUI […]

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Using WriteLaTeX for Collaborative Papers

by Guest January 12, 2015

Adric Riedel is a postdoctoral researcher at the College of Staten Island, working with the Brown Dwarf research in NYC (BDNYC)  group. We all love Google Docs. It’s a functional and convenient way to share and collaboratively edit documents across platforms, time zones, and even continents. We in the BDNYC group use it extensively. But […]


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